Diabetes mellitus is a major non-communicable disease, ranking as a leading cause of death and disability worldwide (Lozano et al., 2012). It is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by elevated blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) resulting from defects in insulin secretion, or insulin action, or both (ADA, 2008).

WHO listed top 10 causes of death worldwide. Among the top ten, in 2016, diabetes is ranked as no 7th. The first cause of death is ‘Ischaemic heart disease’. The interesting thing is, according to the ‘Global Health Risks’ report by WHO, diabetes has a direct causal relationship in developing Ischaemic heart disease.

Worldwide Diabetes Prevalence (Source: IDF, 2017)

International Diabetes Federation (IDF) reports (2017), globally diabetes is increasing at an incredible rate. In South Africa, the increase rate is 156%. In 2017 there are 16 million people who are suffering from diabetes. It is projected to increase at 41 million by 2045. In The Middle East and North America, the growth rate is110%. Thirty-nine million people are already suffering from diabetes and it is projected to increase at 82 million by 2045. Australia has the lowest growth rate, which is 15%. IDF (2013) data also shows – 80% of the population with diabetes lives in low and middle-income countries.

Diabetes is two types: type 1, and type 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the vast majority of diabetes cases worldwide. But the interesting thing is; type 2 diabetes is preventable. A person who is having diabetes (type 1 or 2) can lead a healthy life by managing it properly. Because diabetes is a self-managed disease.

The most interesting thing with diabetes is – globally 46% people having type 2 diabetes don’t know even they have diabetes (IDF, 2013). It is because, they are unaware of the symptoms.

What are the symptoms you should be aware of to know if you have diabetes? In the next blog I will define those symptoms so that you know how to detect diabetes.

 


Reference:

American Diabetes Association (ADA) (2008). “Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus”, Diabetes Care, Vol. 31, No.1, pp.55-60.

International Diabetes Federation (2013). “IDF Diabetes Atlas”, Sixth edition, in L. Guariguata, T. Nolan, J. Beagley, U. Innenkamp, and O. Jacqmain, Eds., Retrieved on 28 October, 2014, from ww.idf.org/diabetesatlas

International Diabetes Federation (2017). “IDF Diabetes Atlas”, Eighth edition, in K. Suvi, F. Joao da Rocha, H. Yadi, and M. Belma, Retrieved on 10 January, 2018, from ww.idf.org/diabetesatlas

Lozano, R., Naghavi, M. and Foreman, K. (2012). “Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study”, The Lancet, Vol. 380, No. 9859, pp. 2095–2128.

World Health Organization (WHO) (2018), “The top 10 causes of death”, Retrieved on 6 June 2018, from http://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top-10-causes-of-death

World Health Organization (WHO) (2009), “Global health risks : Mortality and burden of disease attributable to selected major risks”, Retrieved on 6 June 2018, from World Health Organization (WHO) (2018), “The top 10 causes of death”, Retrieved on 6 June 2018, from http://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top-10-causes-of-death